Gail DuBois Realtor To Find A Home In Southborough


Choosing a front door color for your home can be a difficult feat. While the exterior color of your home is a big decision, it’s often the accents that go along with the base that is an even bigger debate in one’s mind. Typically, your front door will be a different color than the rest of the home. It may seem like a bold decision to have the color of your front door “pop” out from the rest of the home. It’s not that much of a stretch to pick an odd color for the front door. When you pick the right shade, your home will stand out in a good way. The key is in picking a shade that contrasts well with the main color of your home. Here’s some thoughts on the colors that may make the perfect front door hue: Green Green is a perfect color that is relevant the whole year through. From the brightness of spring to the dark of winter, it’s difficult to go wrong with green. There’s many, many different shades of green from celery green to forest, there’s sure to be a shade that will go well with your house. Green shades pair well with grays, blues, browns and tans. Blue Blue is another color with endless shades. The problem with a light blue door is that it wouldn’t stand out very well from the rest of your home. If you decide that blue will go best as a front door color on your home, go for a darker version. It will make a dramatic statement. White If your home is a darker color, white could be a great color for you to paint your door. While white seems kind of boring, it will certainly stand out if your home’s main color is a darker red, blue, or even a gray. Red Red is a bold color for a front door. If your house is a shade of tan or gray, red may be just the color your front door needs. Red is certainly a color that provides a warm welcome to everyone who comes through the door! Yellow Yellow is another bold, stand-out color that you can paint your front door. Yellow pairs well with many grays and shades of tan and white. This bold color will pop out just enough to make your front door give off a sunny vibe for a warm welcome. Whether you want your home to give off a formal vibe or a more relaxed one, there’s a color for your front door. Remember that your front door is only one piece of what gives your home the curb appeal you’re looking for.


13 Presidential Dr, Southborough, MA 01772

Single-Family

$1,795,000
Price

14
Rooms
5
Beds
4/2
Full/Half Baths
One of the most talked about homes in MetroWest is now on the market. This 10,800 sq ft. home with an open floorplan is designed for both formal entertaining & casual living. Features include a 1500 sq ft indoor basketball court, which has drawn the attention of several professional basketball players. Other unique property highlights are an indoor endless pool equipped w/hot tub style massage jets, home theater designed by acoustic expert w/elevated stage & one of the largest home video screens available. Additional highlights include billiards room, arcade room equipped w/ sit down Cruis'n world twin games, & versatile 1500 sq ft room for gym/in-law/office. This unique property is nestled on a hilltop on approx 1.7 acres, 6-car attached garage & close to 2 renowned private schools: Faye School & St Mark's Academy. Situated in one of Southborough's most desirable neighborhoods, Presidential Estates, and ideally located for easy commutes to Boston, Providence & UMass Medical Center.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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While buying a home is a huge decision that should entail a lot of planning and preparation, applying for a mortgage can be surprisingly easy. Just like with other lenders and creditors, a mortgage lender will want to know that letting you borrow money will be a safe investment. Applying for a mortgage is all about ensuring just that.

In today’s post, we’re going to breakdown the home loan application process to help you have the best chances at a smooth and successful mortgage approval. We’ll also define some of the common terms used in mortgages that might leave you scratching your head so you have a better idea of what your options are.

Prequalification and Preapproval

Getting prequalified and preapproved for a mortgaged can both be helpful steps toward securing your home loan. The two terms mean two entirely different things, however.

In order to be prequalified for a mortgage, you typically need to only fill out a simple form (sometimes directly through a lender’s website). On this form, you won’t need to provide specifics or official documents.

Why is this process so simple? Well, that’s because getting prequalified for a loan doesn’t ensure that you’ll actually receive one. Rather, it is simply the first step toward finding out what type of mortgage and interest rates you could receive.

The next step after prequalification is preapproval. To get preapproved, you’ll have to fill out an official mortgage application. Your lender of choice will request a few pieces of information from you, including tax returns, proof of employment for the last two years, and a list of your debts. The lender will also perform a credit check to determine your loan eligibility.

Credit report

At this phase, lenders will also run your credit report. This is a type of “hard credit inquiry” that details your payment history, the number of accounts you have open, and other factors that help make up your credit score.

To secure the lowest interest rate possible, it helps to have a high credit score. So, in the years and months leading up to your mortgage application, focusing on building credit will pay off.

To increase your credit score, you’ll need to focus on paying your bills on time each month. You should also avoid opening new accounts within a few months of applying for a mortgage because this will count as a new credit inquiry. New credit inquiries--including applying for a mortgage--lower your score temporarily, so it’s best to avoid them when possible.

Additional paperwork required for mortgage applications

Not every mortgage application will be the same. Depending on the type of income you receive, you may need to provide different forms of income verification.

Each person will also have to claim different debts and assets. When buying a home with a spouse or partner, it’s important to consider your debts, assets, and credit scores to determine if it’s better to apply jointly or separately.


Anyone who’s ever been in an outdated house or hotel room can tell you that the way we decorate can have an effect on our mood. Certain colors, lack of lighting, and cluttered rooms are all things that, whether we realize it or not, can have a negative effect on our mood and productivity.

These concepts aren’t recent realizations. In ancient China and India, concepts of architecture and decorating have been teaching proper design techniques for thousands of years. Today, these schools of thought are often lumped into the field of environmental psychology.

In today’s post, I’m going to talk about a few design techniques that will help you and your houseguests feel more welcome in your home and create a tone that matches your desires, whether that’s relaxed or energized.

The effects of color

With a quick Google search, you’ll find hundreds of articles discussing the psychological effects of colors. What many fail to mention is the way these effects are based on things like the culture and time period we grow up in.

However, you may find that guests to your home will feel more comfortable in light, neutral- colored rooms than they will in a room that’s painted bold colors.

On a room-by-room basis, there tend to be certain colors that Americans associate with the “right” colors for the occasion.

However, this is often influenced by the architectural style of the house more than an internalized idea about specific colors.

How much is too much?

It’s easy to accumulate home decor and find your walls and surface becoming a little too cluttered. However, bare walls and sparsely decorated rooms can feel a bit too sterile and unlivable. Is there a balance between the two?

Oftentimes the best solution is to follow one simple decorating principle:

Rather than using several small items to decorate a room, choose just a few larger items. This will prevent the room from appearing cluttered but still give it a sense of character.

Taking advantage of the full area of a room

So far, we’ve been talking about how colors and decor can make a room feel more spacious and welcoming. But, even if you have a small room, you can still often achieve this effect.

One solution is to add brighter lighting to the room. Increasing the light makes to room feel more open. And, if possible, natural lighting is the best option, as it can reduce any feelings of claustrophobia.

If better lighting or windows aren’t an option, many homeowners turn to mirrors to make a room feel larger. Larger, wall-hanging mirrors are an excellent way to give the illusion of spaciousness in a small room.


Using the psychology behind these three decorating principles, you’ll be able to make you and your houseguests feel more at ease within your home.


home security cameraIt's a good thing if you feel safe in your neighborhood. It shows that you trust your neighbors and that you have faith in the safety of your family. However, many of us grow so comfortable that we overlook simple security measures that will only improve the safety of your property and your family. Each year in the U.S. there are millions of property crimes carried out. Burglary accounts for a large amount of these crimes. People often say that if a burglar wants to gain entry to your home they'll find a way and determine not to take security measures seriously. If you're of the "it couldn't happen to me" mentality, read no further. But if you want to learn some basic tools and practices that will keep you and your family safer, read on.

Be the burglar

Not literally. But pretend to be. Go through the exterior of your house and think like a burglar. Check your windows. Especially the low-hanging ones. Are all of your locks secured? Do you make it a point to lock them nightly?   Test your locks.  Not all locks are created equal. Doorknob locks are often easily picked or forced open. Deadbolts are harder. However, none of these things matter if the integrity of your door is compromised. French doors, for example, are particularly easy to force open. If you're worried about your locks, consult a locksmith that can help you choose better options. Look inside your home from the sidewalk. Are there valuables within view from the street? Do you have a tendency to leave your garage door open, exposing expensive items like lawnmowers, grills, or even motorcycles? Burglars don't just target homes. Don't end your search with the house. Many items are stolen from sheds, backyards, and even off of porches, which happened to me as a child when a bicycle was taken from our porch in the night.

Tighten up security

The number of small steps we can take to improve security and mitigate risk of burglary is boundless. Here are some security tips that should be on every checklist for home safety:
  • Use a security mailbox and don't leave mail with personal information exposed in front of your home
  • Install a fireproof safe in your home. Hope for the best but plan for the worst. Keep your important documents in the safe, and better yet, keep them backed up in a secure file on the cloud like Google Drive or Dropbox.
  • Use motion light detectors. When calibrated correctly they won't go off for every car or cat that happens by and they're a great theft deterrent.
  • Tell your neighbors if you're going out of town, and have someone take in your mail/newspapers for you. Keep a kitchen light on and a car parked in the driveway if possible.
  • Don't leave spare keys under the rug or anywhere obvious. Also, keep tabs on all of the keys to your home. Know who has a copy and check up on the spare keys on occasion.



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